Storm Drawing Finished

I was able to put in a very long art day today and get a lot done including marking the Storm drawing as finished. I’m super happy with this one.

It has it’s issues, but that is every drawing. Even though I love that I made it my own by taking the character and injecting how I felt she should look.

Storm from marvel comics drawing in charcoal

This whole drawing, except for her face, is from my imagination and the combination of several reference images. I feel that I portrayed Storm as an impressive and commanding person.

Previous Post of my Drawing of Storm

Draw A Box Exercises and Warm-up

Before I got the Storm drawing finished, I started my morning of art by reading the rest of the drawabox.com lesson 0 and starting on the home work for lesson 1.

Kath introduced me to this website and I absolutely love it. For any artist just starting out drawing I HIGHLY recommend starting the lessons and carefully read lesson 0. He addresses all kinds of misconceptions to art making that are essential for anyone just starting out, such as learning to love failure.

“The most important point I can make here is this: Doing something badly does not define who you are. It doesn’t say anything about you as a person, and it is not the basis upon which you can reasonably be judged.”

Uncomfortable from Drawabox.com

The founder named Uncomfortable also goes into a lot of the technical and analytical skills necessary to progress as a draftsman with the greatest velocity. Much of the wisdom he shares on the site I only figure out later in my art journey.

Because of this wonderful site and it’s influence I’m changing up my warmup process slightly and possibly replacing the current exercises that I created for the basic form with the Draw A Box lessons.

Warm-up
Draw A Box exercises

Cylinder Practice

My cylinder practice turned into a lot more practice with free hand single line ellipses. I was drawing a bunch of cylinders and trying to get them right without much helping line. I found that most of the cylinders didn’t turn out to well and decided to up my game to ink.

The drawabox.com lessons have you start with ink, mostly because it is an unforgiving medium. Once you put it down it’s there and you’re less apt to draw construction lines first, such as with a pencil. What I like about it is that you are forced to bring a deeply focused presence to each and every line you draw.

Cylinder practice

Form Studies

I’m still working from Nicolaides’ book and today’s exercise is the 10 minute form studies. I’ve gotten to a point where I not following some of the exercises exactly how he describes them and this is one.

Nicolaides wants me to focus on pushing and pulling the form into and out of space with the pressure of my charcoal in the paper. To literally try and feel the body receding and advancing. But I’m using more of a Steve Huston method of trying to see the basic forms in each body part. Although I didn’t have as much focus as I could have for today’s exercises.

Daily Composition and Daily Sketch

Yesterday I was wondering if I should continue with these execises and today I determined they are essential, for two reasons.

First, I want to improve my memory and the daily compositions influence me to bring as much presence to every situation I’m in because I’m also gathering material from these interactions.

Second reason is that I love the constant reminder that am no where near being a master artists and I have a lot to work on. It’s a daily challenge issued to me and a source of motivation.

In short, I’ll be doing these every day and maybe for the rest of my life.

daily composition and daily sketch

What went well?

Tons of art time and the Storm drawing finished!

What needs work?

I need to work on not neglecting my 1000 second timer when I’m deep into art. The exercise and movement is very important, my health comes first.

What did I learn?

Using many online resources and can improve my lessons tremendously.

6 Comments

  1. The Storm drawing posed from imagination is totally amazing! I didn’t realize that is from imagination you mentioned it. she looks very commanding indeed. For Nicolaides modelled drawing, I found the instructions very confusing. I remember you saying that you haven’t read ahead, so wasn’t sure if you would want to hear about my take on the exercise. I’ll type them in the paragraph below so stop reading now if you want to keep them a surprise.

    From what I understood of it now, it is essentially trying to teach you contour hatching, which I think you can do very well already. It is part of the core of the current exercise I am on now (and I think for the second half of the book), which is essentially gesture + contour + modelled drawing (except you can use the actual light source for light and dark). I believe the earlier modelled drawing are trying to get you to pay attention to subtle undulation in the surface without getting distracted by the light source. He sort of mentioned this later – it’s like the light source comes directly from your eye (therefore lightest for the surface closest to you). Hope that helps.

    • Thank you very much for the compliment! Also thanks for the insight on the Nicolaides exercises. I agree, Nicolaides was taught by John Sloan who was taught by Robert Henri and most of the lessons are tailored around the theory of Robert Henri’s teaching. It’s about feeling the form and weight rather than just seeing the surface. These exercises are more about cultivating that elusive part of art called intuition, impulse, idea, motive or spirit rather than the focus on building technique and skills. I believe that both the technique and spirit is important and each artist would do well to have a healthy portion of each. I’ve been on both ends of the spectrum and Nicolaides plus Robert Henri are helping me cultivate a balance. Thank you for the comment!

  2. This is your best one yet (although I think I say that for each and every new drawing you complete…). Fantastic work. Keep up the momentum and motivation.

Add a comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.